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They will party like it 1986.

Video may have killed the radio star, but some archival videos are bringing an teen nightclub back to life if only for one night.

Changes, a former Winnipeg nightclub that was exclusive to members 13 to 17 years old, is celebrating a 30th anniversary benefit dance party Saturday at The Pyramid Cabaret on Fort Street.

Changes opened in in a strip mall on Pembina Highway at Stafford Street and closed in It was like any adult nightclub, said former member Rebecca Hadfield, except it didn serve alcohol and was for teens only.

“For a lot of us it was the first time we were meeting kids from around the city,” said Hadfield, 43, who grew up in St. Vital. “Before social media, you didn really have contact that way.

“It was a great way to meet like minded people and a lot of us have stayed in touch.”

In CKY TV began filming shows at the club that aired every Saturday, much like American Bandstand.

“They would film three episodes in one night,” Hadfield recalled. “You would bring a couple changes of clothes, so when they filmed each episode we weren all wearing the same thing.

“They would always say wave at the cameras,
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but we would always wave at the cameras.”

Another former club member, Jay Shapiro, acquired videos of the CKY shows about eight years ago. Sadly, Shapiro passed away at age 47 last year, but another former Changes member, Ken Bond, started posting the videos on Facebook last summer.

“People on Facebook started tagging each other in the videos,” Hadfield said. “That how it started spreading. Ken was smart. He posted them one at a time so as each one came up people were looking for themselves and friends.

“I think we passed the point of being really embarrassed by the hair, the clothes and the dancing. People were really getting a kick out of seeing themselves in the videos.”

The popularity prompted Hadfield to contact Bond with the idea of a reunion dance party. Bond suggested waiting until this year to celebrate the club 30th anniversary.

Hadfield was a member of Changes teen advisory board and the club had a parents advisory board as well, she said. At one time Changes had 5,000 members, who paid a couple bucks to get in and could bring one non member guest each.

“There was a really great DJ and they always focused on trying to play more of the music you didn hear on the radio as much more on the alternative side,” she said.

“Going to Changes was like a much cooler school dance,
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but even school dances have become less of a thing now. (Today) teens have full access to all that music online. We had to go out to hear it.”